Contents

The Rolls

There is a simplified list of the links to the different parts of each roll at A List of the Rolls.

In the section European Rolls of Arms I have consulted a total of seventeen rolls. They are listed below, with a brief description of the likely date, present location, type, and the main source of my study.

The pages of the Caerlaverock Poem & The Falkirk Roll have references to other places where arms are found.

The Dering Roll (A)

British Library.

Last quarter of the 13th century. The Dering Roll contains 324 coats-of-arms, approximately one quarter of the English baronage at that time, beginning with two of King John's illegitimate children, Richard Fitz Roy and William de Say. The Roll came into the ownership of the notable antiquary, Sir Edward Dering, 1598–1644, who probably acquired it during his years of service as lieutenant of Dover Castle. The parchment roll measures 2645mm by c. 210mm and is complete, consisting of 4 membranes, each measuring approximately 660mm in length. Painted on a green background, it contains 324 coats of arms arranged in 54 rows, with 6 shields assigned to each line. Above each shield is written the knight's name in English cursive script, with the exception of five shields where the names have been omitted or erased.

Glover's Roll (B)

British Museum, Add MS 29796.

Painted, with blazons, containing 218 coats. The date of the original is soon after 1258.

Source: H S London, Rolls of Arms of Henry III, Aspilogia II, Society of Antiquaries, London, 1957.

The Bigot Roll (BA)

Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, fonds français no 18648 fo 32 - 39.

An occasional roll, of for an expedition made by Charles, comte d'Anjou, in the spring of 1254, the original dating from this time. Blazoned, in the Picard dialect, containing 300 coats.

Source: Robert Nussard,Le Rôle d'Armes Bigot, Le léopard d'or, Paris, 1985.

Walford's Roll (C)

British Museum, MS Harl 6589, fo12, 12b.

Blazons, containing 185 coats. The date of the original is c1275.

Source: H S London, Rolls of Arms of Henry III, Aspilogia II, Society of Antiquaries, London, 1957.

The Chifflet-Prinet Roll (CP)

Bibliothèque Municipale, Besançon, Collection Chifflet, MS 186, pp145-154.

Loosely dated 1285-1298.Blazoned, containing 147 coats.

Sources: Gerard J Brault, Eight Thirteenth Century Rolls of Arms, Pennsylvania State University Press, 1973; Max Prinet, Le Moyen Age 31, 1934, pp 1-49.

The Camden Roll (D)

British Museum, Cotton Roll, 8.

Painted, with blazons for 185 of the 270 coats. dated c1280.

Source: Gerard J Brault, Eight Thirteenth Century Rolls of Arms, Pennsylvania State University Press, 1973.

St George's Roll (E)

College of Arms, London, MS Vincent 164 ff 1-21b.Dated c1285.

Painted, containing 677 shields.

Source: Gerard J Brault, Rolls of Arms of Edward I, Boydell & Brewer, 1997.

Charles' Roll (F)

Charles' Roll (F) Society of Antiquaries, London, MS517. The copy is probably from the fifteenth century. Dated c1285, containing 486 painted shields with names over. Source: Gerard J Brault, Rolls of Arms of Edward I, Boydell & Brewer, 1997.

The Galloway Roll (GA)

College of Arms, London, MS M.14, ff. 168-75. Copy by Sir Thomas Wriothesley, Garter King of Arms, d1534.

Dated 1300, containing 259 blazoned shields of knights present with Edward I on his Scottish campaign of 1300.

Source: Gerard J Brault, Rolls of Arms of Edward I, Boydell & Brewer, 1997.

The Falkirk Roll (H)

British Museum, MS Harl 6589, f9-9b.

An occasional roll, made soon after the battle of Falkirk, 1298, containing 115 blazoned coats.

Source: Gerard J Brault, Eight Thirteenth Century Rolls of Arms, Pennsylvania State University Press, 1973.

The Heralds' Roll (HE)

c.1280 (College of Arms MS B.29).??

Herald's Roll (HE) FitzWilliam Museum, Cambridge, MS297. The copy, from the fifteenth century is on vellum, bound into a book. Dated c1280, containing 697 painted shields, with names. Source: Source: Gerard J Brault, Rolls of Arms of Edward I, Boydell & Brewer, 1997.

The Caerlaverock Poem (K)

British Museum, Cotton Caligula A XVIII, ff 23b-30b.

Unusual, in that the roll is presented as a poem, which is a contemporary account of the capture of Caerlaverock Castle, Dumfries, by Edward I, in July 1300. It contains 110 coats.

Source: Gerard J Brault, Eight Thirteenth Century Rolls of Arms, Pennsylvania State University Press, 1973.

The Lord Marshal's Roll (LM)

Society of Antiquaries, London, ms664, vol 1, ff 19-25. Dated 1295.The roll contains 565 painted shields, 42 of which are blank, and 48 have no name.

A persistent error in the roll is the painting of argent instead of or, and many other coats are difficult to decipher. This roll should not be used as a source of definitive coats of arms.

Source: Gerard J Brault, Rolls of Arms of Edward I, Boydell & Brewer, 1997.

Collin's Roll (Q)

Collins' Roll (Q) Queen's College, Oxford, ms158, pp366-402. Tricked copy c1640. Another copy in the College of Arms, London, has painted shields, c1640 Dated 1296, containing 598 painted shields. Source: Source: Gerard J Brault, Rolls of Arms of Edward I, Boydell & Brewer, 1997.

The Stirling Roll (ST)

College of Arms, London, MS M.14, ff 269-72. Copy by Sir Thomas Wriothesley, Garter King of Arms, d1534.

Dated 1304, containing 102 coats in Anglo-Norman blazon.

Source: Gerard J Brault, Rolls of Arms of Edward I, Boydell & Brewer, 1997. Le Rôle d'Armes du Hérault Vermandois

Armorial du Hérault Vermandois (VE)

Compiled between c1285 and c1300. The original is lost, and a fifteenth century copy, made before the death of Charles VII in 1461, is in the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, MS.français 2249.

It is this copy which serves as the base for the present work, although there are three others which were made later. Little is known of its background.

Vermandois formed part of the present region of Picardy in Northern France, and was a part of the possessions of the French crown, under Philippe II Auguste, from 1185 onwards.

The manuscript is written in the Picard dialect, and contains the blazons of 1076 coats of arms.

The first work on the armorial was carried out in 1952, by Hugh Stanford-London. He simply transcribed the blasons as they appear in the original, without gloss. He presumably intended to publish his work at a later date, but died before he could do so. Some changes to the transcriptions were added by Paul Adam-Even, and a few by Robert Nussard, but the original typescript has remained in the Institut de la Recherche des Textes Historiques in Paris since the death of H S London.

Armorial Wijnbergen (WN)

Royal Dutch Association of Genealogy & Heraldry, The Hague.

The oldest known original French heraldic manuscript. It is in two parts, not of the same date: the first, showing arms of the vassals of the Ile de France under Saint Louis, can be dated 1265-1270; the second, an armorial of the north of France, the Low Countries and Germany under Philippe III, le hardi, is more difficult to date, but is a complement to the first, 1270-1285. The roll is entirely painted, with the text in French, containing a total of 1312 shields in the two parts.

Source: a series of articles published in Archives Héraldiques Suisses between 1951 and 1954 by Paul Adam-Even and Léon Jéquier.

The Parliamentary Roll (N)

Also known as the Great or Bannerets' Roll. British Museum MS Cotton, Caligula A. XVIII, ff. 3-21

Date 1312-1314. The roll contains 1110 names with blazons. Following a section of 169 blazons of earls and bannerets the rest of the manuscript is divided into bearers from English counties.

The source here is "A Roll of Arms of the Reign of Edward the Second", edited by Nicholas Harris Nicholas, London, William Pickering, 1829.